The Lumber Jills - Clue 3
Description
Media Type
Image
Item Type
Photographs
Description
Stone piles and Stone Fences
The LumberJills from Balsam Hill share growing-up-on-the-farm memories. One such memory is the yearly spring “picking stones” evening. If we had a dime for every stone we threw onto a wagon and then onto the stone pile or stone fence we would be rich. Since we live on the edge of the Canadian Shield on land whose fate was determined by receding glaciers, our young farmer fates were determined also.
Our stones are painted with the LumberJack “Buffalo “ plaid and a tree representing the Lumber industry that opened up the Ottawa Valley and Renfrew County.
Bev will hide her rock and give clues for finding it to her 7 year old Grandson. Then she will tell him a stone-picking story about his Great Grandfather and the farm on which she lives . (est. 1928)
Gail has selected a rock from a stone wall built at her parents’ home . The wall was constructed by her Great-uncle with stones from the original farm settled in 1880.. She will tell her (young adult) nieces stories about stone-picking with her brother, their Dad.
Ruth’s stone came from a stone pile that was created when the family farm was cleared and established in 1870. It is in the middle of a field and is still a nuisance when cutting, raking or baling hay around it… no straight rows in that part of the field. When it is in pasture, young calves like to climb on it. She will help her 3 yr old Grandson, Jack find the rock in her flower bed and talk about her Father who was also Jack.
Lynn doesn’t remember if she originally picked her stone and put it on the stonepile on her family’s heritage farm. She does remember many evenings when stone pickers were rewarded with Lemonade and Chocolate cake. Her painted rock will stand in the Welcome display at her front door and she will explain its significance at the annual cousins Reunion at the end of June.
Notes
Submission part of the WISH challenge for WI's 125th anniversary.
Date of Publication
Jun 2022
Subject(s)
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 45.43341 Longitude: -76.83273
Donor
Lynn Clelland
Copyright Statement
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Holder
photographer
Contact
Federated Women's Institutes of Ontario
 fwio@fwio.on.ca
 

 
552 Ridge Road
Stoney Creek, ON L8J 2Y6
905-662-2691
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The Lumber Jills - Clue 3


Stone piles and Stone Fences
The LumberJills from Balsam Hill share growing-up-on-the-farm memories. One such memory is the yearly spring “picking stones” evening. If we had a dime for every stone we threw onto a wagon and then onto the stone pile or stone fence we would be rich. Since we live on the edge of the Canadian Shield on land whose fate was determined by receding glaciers, our young farmer fates were determined also.
Our stones are painted with the LumberJack “Buffalo “ plaid and a tree representing the Lumber industry that opened up the Ottawa Valley and Renfrew County.
Bev will hide her rock and give clues for finding it to her 7 year old Grandson. Then she will tell him a stone-picking story about his Great Grandfather and the farm on which she lives . (est. 1928)
Gail has selected a rock from a stone wall built at her parents’ home . The wall was constructed by her Great-uncle with stones from the original farm settled in 1880.. She will tell her (young adult) nieces stories about stone-picking with her brother, their Dad.
Ruth’s stone came from a stone pile that was created when the family farm was cleared and established in 1870. It is in the middle of a field and is still a nuisance when cutting, raking or baling hay around it… no straight rows in that part of the field. When it is in pasture, young calves like to climb on it. She will help her 3 yr old Grandson, Jack find the rock in her flower bed and talk about her Father who was also Jack.
Lynn doesn’t remember if she originally picked her stone and put it on the stonepile on her family’s heritage farm. She does remember many evenings when stone pickers were rewarded with Lemonade and Chocolate cake. Her painted rock will stand in the Welcome display at her front door and she will explain its significance at the annual cousins Reunion at the end of June.